Friday, May 22, 2020

Forbidden Love Or Forced Partner - 1730 Words

Julissa Ruiz Prof. Hunter Intro to Afram Studies November 24, 2014 Forbidden Love Or Forced Partner? When our nation was divided because of skin color, dating someone who was not of the same complexion was seen as a criminal act. Interracial relationships between white Americans and African Americans, when slavery was still legal, was seen as taboo, and many attempted to prevent them from occurring. Laws were passed prohibiting personal relationships between the two cultures, which many paid little attention to. Relationships between white men and enslaved women, and black men and white women affected them in numerous ways. The power dynamic in the south was a key element in the treatment the enslaved partners received, and the legal repercussions affected both white and black greatly. Fay Yarbrough paints a picture in her article, â€Å"Power, Perception, And Interracial Sex: Former Slaves Recall A Multiracial South†, that shows how white males and females used the legal power they possessed to have the upper hand on their colored partners. She explains that while many free whites and their enslaved companions had consensual relationships, slaves ultimately had no choice; at the end of the day, they were legally considered to be property and had to do what their masters asked. Jason A. Gillmer, author of â€Å"Base Wretches and Black Wenches: A Story of Sex and Race, Violence and Compassion, During Slavery Times†, describes how even though interracial relationships were frownedShow MoreRelatedA Tale of Oppression and Reaction: Handmaid ´s Tale by Margaret Atwood1196 Words   |  5 Pagesuseable; instead her husband, Luke, must transfer some of his money to her account. The government is sending the message that women are not able to provide for themselves; their husbands are superior to them, and their guidance is necessary. Women are forbidden to read. Instead, they must rely on pictorial signs for information. This decree further dehumanizes the women as it stunts their intelligence and self-esteem by preventing them from expanding their s cholarly progress. In addition, no longer areRead MoreGay, Lesbian And Transgender People1382 Words   |  6 Pagescompletely forbidden however in some tribes; â€Å"similar to practices in ancient Greece, unmarried men entered into sexual relationships with youths with the expectation that the relationships would end once they married.† Some tribes even believed that particular people within the tribe held both male and female sprits. They were referred to as a â€Å"Two-One†. This allowed them to engage in relationships with both male and a female. The actions undertaken by the â€Å"Two-One’s† would have been forbidden for â€Å"normal†Read MoreIslamic Ideas on Arranged Marriages1887 Words   |  7 Pages Marriage is an institute commemorated in most parts of the world. Unlike western societies, where love is a precondition to marriage, in many other parts of the world it is still not a requirement. A popular saying among these traditional cu ltures is first comes marriage, and then comes love. The Islamic community is one of the many cultures that embrace arranged marriages. Until very recently, research on Islamic marriage and family formation have been sparse. Raeann Hamon summarizes this absenceRead MorePorphyria s Lover By Robert Browning1472 Words   |  6 PagesBrowning’s dramatic monologue entitled â€Å"Porphyria’s Lover† tells the story of a meeting between a man and a woman that begins filled with romance, but quickly turns sinister. Porphyria visits the speaker at his cottage late at night, to confess her love for him even though they cannot be together. The speaker, filled with happiness in the newfound knowledge that Porphyria â€Å"worshiped† him, kills her by strangling her with her own hair in order to free her from her â€Å"vainer ties† and allow them to beRead MoreDivergent Trilogy by Veronica Roth1030 Words   |  4 Pagesdesires that are being limited by the law. In 1984 Winston makes rash acts of rebellion to test the limits of the power, such as having a forbidden love affair, joining the anti-Party brotherhood and writing â€Å"Down with Big Brother,† (Orwell 20) several times in his diary. Aside from, their designated partner for the only purpose of producing children, it is forbidden to have romantic relationships. As a suppressed natural desire for companionship, Winston is taking a huge risk by seeking to have aRead MoreSociological Perspectives Of Functionalism And Symbolic Interactionism1442 Words   |  6 Pagesis exchanged between the two, though eventually their words of love began to sound forced and cheesy. Both partners engaged in affairs controversial even by today’s standards. The Whitakers adhered to the norms of their community and kept up their facade until their true feelings were evident to themselves and their peers. The couple’s falling out was seen during their trip to Miami. The way they declare their adoration sounded forced and ungenuine compared to their more cordial comments to theirRead MoreMale Abuse Is The Hidden Side Of Domestic Violence1050 Words   |  5 PagesMen don’t tell Male abuse is the hidden side of domestic violence. Representative sample surveys of the population show that abuse is a fifty-fifty proposition when it comes to intimate partner violence. The only exception to these figures is shown in the major national survey produced by the National Violence Against Women survey which found that thirty-six percent of the victims are male (Kimmell, 2001). The issue is not that men don’t tell, no one actually asks. Women on the otherRead MoreHistory, Laws, And Health Impacts On Marriages And Divorce1687 Words   |  7 PagesIn our society, little girls and boys are classically trained to believe in fairytale finding the one and only love. The price charming or snow white; from daily cartoons like the Little Mermaid to animated movies like Frozen. The traditional belief is to one day get married and start a family. Dating websites like Match, eHarmony, or OkCupid spends millions of dollar each year to marketing to people that are lo oking for marriage. On the other hand, there are Sorrell Trope and Daniel Jaffe; bothRead MoreA Tangled Web Of Relationships Essay2108 Words   |  9 PagesA Tangled Web of Relationships: We always long for the forbidden things, and desire what is denied us.- Francois Rabelai. There have been many different cultures and customs that have evolved throughout society and throughout many centuries; many rules have been put in place. In society, there have always been rules and barriers; and in some cases it has divided people. Whether it is prejudices from ignorance or differences in belief systems or religions, these restrictions on life have isolatedRead MoreEssay on Equal Rights1559 Words   |  7 PagesCompare and Contrast essay on equal rights This type of legal marriage must be forbidden because natural instinct revolts it as wrong Throughout the history of the United States, there has been a class system that tried to define the people who lived here. The people who started this system gave large rights to those who would benefit from it, while at the same time restrict those they deemed unworthy of such privilege. In the beginning this burden fell mainly on the slaves who built the

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act - 836 Words

Shivangi Patel LAW 110 – MO1 Vincent Petraro Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Foreign Corrupt Practices Act was introduced in 1977.It was made effective from December 19, 1977. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act applies to all citizen of United State and certain foreign issuers of security and foreign companies. The Minor changes were made in the year 1988 and in 1998.Foreign Corrupt Practices Act has two main Provision (a)Accounting Transparency under Securities Exchange Commission, 1934. (b)Bribery of Foreign Officials. Department of Justice (DOJ)and Securities Exchange Commission(SEC) are responsible for enforcement of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Powerful influence of both Department of Justice and Securities Exchange Commission†¦show more content†¦However, due to enforcement of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the US exports decreased which also resulted in decrease of Foreign Direct Investment because Foreign Corrupt Practices Act discourages firms from investing in foreign markets. Companies engaging in mergers and acquisition in emerging markets face uniquely increased level of regulatory and corruption risk. This is mainly due to three reasons: 1) In many foreign countries, informal payments substitute for formal economic institutions familiar to enforcement officials in developed countries, implying that on formal payments reduce US companies access to foreign economic institutions. 2) Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement imposes direct cost on international investment through fines. Profit disgorgement, and reputational degradation that occurs when companies are targeted by Department of Justice and Securities Exchange Commission. Also, agencies possess enormous scope while deciding which payments are to be classified as bribes. 3) The lack of clarity of informal payments which triggers increase in legal defense, and due diligence spending by US multinational it raises the cost of investing in the foreign markets. To compete in global markets US firms were trying to subvert anti-bribery legislation. They can substitute financial contribution for hiring additional labors. Thus, they would reduce capital- to-labor-ratio. American firmsShow MoreRelatedThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1442 Words   |  6 PagesThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act has been pursued by government agencies recently as the SEC, the FBI, and Department of Justice are cracking down on international business corruption. Companies are working harder at expanding economically in the market by doing business with individuals and other companies in foreign countries. Foreign countries are not always in compliance with US laws and regulations, causing US companies who deal with them issues with compliance on the home front. Because ofRead More The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1551 Words   |  7 PagesThe foreign Corrupt Practices Act prohibits paying or offering anything of value to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or keeping a business. The FCPA was enacted by congress in 1977 due to various reports that were made by the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC). The Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) reported different issues concerning bribery and illegal payments by United Sates companies. The FCPA states that it’s unlawful to make payments to foreign officials; having a corruptRead MoreForeign Corrupt Practices Act :1275 Words   |  6 PagesRunning Head: FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT 1 FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT BUSINESS LAW Katherine Hall-Blair Keiser University FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT 2 FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT In the face of improper payments to officials abroad, the United States introduced the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977. This act was a pioneer step for the government of the United States to combat illegal bribes by not only U.S. companies, but overseas companiesRead MoreThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1320 Words   |  6 PagesI. Introduction The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (â€Å"FCPA†) is the first globally enforcing statute making anti-corruption effort in the world. It has been known for the broad enforcement coverage in terms of the worldwide governing jurisdiction and anti-gaming legislative approach leading to a long time debates and discussions among practitioners and law commentators. This paper will focus on improving one of the undefined and broadly interpreted terms - â€Å"instrumentality† in the anti-bribery provisionsRead MoreForeign Corrupt Practices Act1207 Words   |  5 PagesFCPA PAPER The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (FCPA) evolved from investigations by the Office of the Special Prosecutor that provided evidence of illegal acts perpetrated by U.S. firms in foreign lands. More than 400 U.S. companies admitted to making questionable payments to various foreign governments and political parties as part of an amnesty program (U.S. Department of Justice http://www.usdoj.gov). Given the environment of the 1970s and the proliferation of white-collar crimes (e.gRead MoreThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1181 Words   |  5 PagesWhile reading this case analysis, The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act came into discussion as an underlying factor in Weihardt’s decision. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act was enacted for the purpose of making it unlawful for certain classes of persons and entities to make payments to foreign government officials to assist in obtaining or retaining business. This practice applies to Weinhardt in the fact that he was given the oppor tunity to give Lee a bribe to obtain Lees’ business. If WeinhardtRead MoreThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act654 Words   |  3 PagesThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977 and the corresponding amendments set forth by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 and Amendments of 1998 have tremendous ramifications for U.S. multinational companies at large, their subsidiaries, and foreign partners.   While the main purpose of the original policy was to make it â€Å"unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business†, the many statutes, their exceptionsRead MoreThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1028 Words   |  4 Pagesproblems. Such is the case with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act - passed with the purpose of keeping companies that do business in the US ethical in their business dealings. The main purpose of the act is to prevent companies from paying bribes to foreign officials, though there are other provisions included. It is only fitting that Wal-Mart, the largest retail store in the United States (2013 Top Global Retailers) has had allegations of wron gdoing related to the act. Wal-Mart was reported to haveRead MoreThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Of 19771104 Words   |  5 PagesThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (FCPA) evolved from investigations by the Office of the Special Prosecutor that provided evidence of illegal acts perpetrated by U.S. firms in foreign lands. More than 400 U.S. companies admitted to making questionable payments to various foreign governments and political parties as part of an amnesty program (U.S. Department of Justice http://www.usdoj.gov). Given the environment of the 1970s and the proliferation of white-collar crimes (e.g., insider tradingRead MoreEssay On Foreign Corrupt Practices Act1405 Words   |  6 PagesVu Le Vu LGLS 3562 Michael Valenza December 7th, 2017 Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) FCPA Background The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the â€Å"FCPA† or the â€Å"Act†) is one of the primary statutes in the U.S. for fighting against corruption around the world. After the Watergate scandals and revelation of widespread corruption and bribery all over the globe by U.S companies, the FCPA was established in 1977 by Congress [1]. Before passing the FCPA, the government found that more than 400 companies

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History Free Essays

Chapter 17 Assessment 1. progressive movement- Efforts to make govt. more responsive to the people, restore economic opportunities, and correct injustices. We will write a custom essay sample on Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History or any similar topic only for you Order Now 2. muckraker- One of the magazine journalists who exposed the corrupt side of business and public life 3. suffrage- The right to vote 4. Susan B. Anthony- Co-founder of the national woman suffrage association in 1869. 5. Theodore Roosevelt- 26th president of the US. His term lasted from 1901-1909. Known for the â€Å"square deal† politics, that describes progressive reforms, of big business that victimized workers . NAACP- National association for the advancement of colored people founded in 1909 to promote full racial equality 7. Gifford Pinchot- Head of US forest service under president Roosevelt believed that wilderness areas could be scientifically managed for public enjoyment while allowing private development. 8. Woodrow Wilson- 28th president of the united states, from 1913-1921. Continued Roosevelt’s and Taft’s antitrust effort. Enacted his program called â€Å"New Freedom† that attacked trusts Tariffs and high finance. . Clayton Antitrust Act- 19 14 declaring certain business practices illegal. A corporation could no longer acquire stock of another corporation if it would create a monopoly. 10. Federal Reserve System- a way to make credit more easily available outside the financial centers of New York and Boston. Credit and money would keep pace with the economy. 1. The four goals are protect social welfare, promote moral improvement, create economic reform and foster efficiency. 2. Limit working hours for women and children, and workers compensation for workers hurt or killed on the job. 3. City government became aware of corruption and mismanagement and used various strategies to reform and become more responsible. 4. Domestic work 5. 1. NAWSA: national American woman suffrage association. Women’s right to vote. 2. NACW: national association of colored women. Managed nurseries, reading rooms and kindergartens 6. He exposed unsanitary conditions in food industry. They made new sanitation laws, inspections/ FDA. 7.EXP LAIN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ROOSEVELT’S FORM OF PROGRESSIVISM AND WILSON’S at  https://donemyessay.com/apush-chapter-29/ Roosevelt emerged as a trust buster by using the Sherman Anti-Trust Act to break up some of the nation’s largest corporations. 8. Although he accomplished many things, he was not popular, and did not receive credit for what he did. 9. Republican conservatives and progressives split over Taft’s support of the political boss Joseph Cannon. 10. Declared certain business practices illegal. This prevented monopolies. 11. Wilson did not support woman suffrage and introduced segregation into the federal government. He did not want to change things. 1. Square deal was a program to keep the wealthy and powerful from taking advantage of small businesses and the poor. While the New Freedom was a program to allow small businesses to have more opportunities. The similarities were that both Roosevelt and Wilson were both trying to help out the small businesses. 2. The social economic and political impulses that caused the reform movement were many things. Women without a right to vote, low morale and many people without money or education to get money. Also the heavy presence of child labor. 1. C 2. F 3. A How to cite Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History, Papers Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History Free Essays Chapter 17 Assessment 1. progressive movement- Efforts to make govt. more responsive to the people, restore economic opportunities, and correct injustices. We will write a custom essay sample on Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History or any similar topic only for you Order Now 2. muckraker- One of the magazine journalists who exposed the corrupt side of business and public life 3. suffrage- The right to vote 4. Susan B. Anthony- Co-founder of the national woman suffrage association in 1869. 5. Theodore Roosevelt- 26th president of the US. His term lasted from 1901-1909. Known for the â€Å"square deal† politics, that describes progressive reforms, of big business that victimized workers . NAACP- National association for the advancement of colored people founded in 1909 to promote full racial equality 7. Gifford Pinchot- Head of US forest service under president Roosevelt believed that wilderness areas could be scientifically managed for public enjoyment while allowing private development. 8. Woodrow Wilson- 28th president of the united states, from 1913-1921. Continued Roosevelt’s and Taft’s antitrust effort. Enacted his program called â€Å"New Freedom† that attacked trusts Tariffs and high finance. . Clayton Antitrust Act- 19 14 declaring certain business practices illegal. A corporation could no longer acquire stock of another corporation if it would create a monopoly. 10. Federal Reserve System- a way to make credit more easily available outside the financial centers of New York and Boston. Credit and money would keep pace with the economy. 1. The four goals are protect social welfare, promote moral improvement, create economic reform and foster efficiency. 2. Limit working hours for women and children, and workers compensation for workers hurt or killed on the job. 3. City government became aware of corruption and mismanagement and used various strategies to reform and become more responsible. 4. Domestic work 5. 1. NAWSA: national American woman suffrage association. Women’s right to vote. 2. NACW: national association of colored women. Managed nurseries, reading rooms and kindergartens 6. He exposed unsanitary conditions in food industry. They made new sanitation laws, inspections/ FDA. 7. Roosevelt emerged as a trust buster by using the Sherman Anti-Trust Act to break up some of the nation’s largest corporations. 8. Although he accomplished many things, he was not popular, and did not receive credit for what he did. 9. Republican conservatives and progressives split over Taft’s support of the political boss Joseph Cannon. 10. Declared certain business practices illegal. This prevented monopolies. 11. Wilson did not support woman suffrage and introduced segregation into the federal government. He did not want to change things. 1. Square deal was a program to keep the wealthy and powerful from taking advantage of small businesses and the poor. While the New Freedom was a program to allow small businesses to have more opportunities. The similarities were that both Roosevelt and Wilson were both trying to help out the small businesses. 2. The social economic and political impulses that caused the reform movement were many things. Women without a right to vote, low morale and many people without money or education to get money. Also the heavy presence of child labor. 1. C 2. F 3. A How to cite Chapter 17 Assessment U.S. History, Essay examples

Monday, April 27, 2020

The Company Essays - Age Of Sail, Chartered Companies,

The Company The East India Company is a modern, dynamic commercial enterprise with a wealth of experience and contacts, and associates throughout the world. Founded by the Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth the First in 1600, The East India Company was once the single most powerful economic force that the world has ever seen. Based in London, its influence reached out to all continents, and the consequences of its actions, both great and small, are the very fabric of history itself -- the Company, for example, created British India, caused the Boston Tea Party, founded Hong Kong and Singapore, employed Captain Kidd to combat piracy, established tea in India, held Napoleon captive, and made the fortune of Elihu Yale. Its flag inspired the Stars and Stripes, its shipyards provided the model for St. Petersburg, its administration still forms the basis of Indian bureaucracy, and its corporate structure was the earliest example of a joint stock company. It introduced tea to the British, woollens to Japan, chinzes to America, spices to the West Indies, opium to China, porcelain to Russia, and polo to India. It had its own armies, navies, currencies, and territories as diverse as the tiny Spice Island, Pulo Run -- later exchanged for Manhattan -- to the Jewel in the Crown, India itself. Foundation of the Empire The intentions of the 218 Knights and merchants of the City of London who formed the East India Company, and those of Queen Elizabeth I who granted its Royal Charter on December 31st 1600, were rarely matched by the outcome. The venture failed to achieve its stated objectives -- it made little impression on the Dutch control of the spice trade and could not establish a lasting outpost in the East Indies in the early years -- and yet succeeded beyond measure in establishing military dominance and a political empire for Britain in the East. Company or Colonial Government? The tension between the straightforward commercial aims of the Court of Directors in London, who simply desired that the Company should be able to trade profitably and peacefully, and the opportunist vision of the officers sent to implement its policies, continued through until well into the nineteenth century, and even Clive's astonishing military achievements met with a chorus of disapproval from his superiors at home. But time and geographical distance made the attempts of the Directors to direct in reality well-nigh impossible, and ultimately it lay in the hands of its officers to make what they could of the prevailing situation in the field. That they did with a vengeance, so successfully that by 1834, whilst nominally still a company with shareholders and directors in the ordinary way, in fact the East India Company had ceased to be trading company at all, and was instead authorised ruler of the vast Indian subcontinent and numerous other possessions. A Barbarian Nation To understand how this transformation had taken place is to look into the changing role on the international stage of Britain itself. The history of the East India Company and that of its native country are in this respect inseparable. Up until the late Elizabethan age the English were regarded by the then-dominant European powers of Spain and France as an uncultured, barbarian nation snapping at the heels of its more civilised neighbours. The activities of Drake, for all the vaunted status of his defeat of the Spanish Armada, were in reality those of a licensed pirate, and unlike the Dutch, Britain lacked a coordinated maritime trading strategy. It was to fill this gap that the East India Company was formed, but it was too late to make any serious impression on the Dutch stranglehold on the lucrative spice trade from the East Indies, and the Company was reduced to picking up scraps of trade, either by piracy or dealing with intermediaries. The one tiny nutmeg-producing island held by the Company in the King's name in the Spice Islands became a source of such pride to James I that he styled himself King of England, Scotland, Ireland, France ... and Puloroon. The massacre of Company factors by the Dutch at Amboyna in 1623 put paid to such vain territorial ambitions, and the Company was forced to live at the devotion of wind and

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Proposed Study To Determine The Effects Of Heat On Essays

Proposed Study To Determine The Effects Of Heat On Essays Proposed Study To Determine The Effects Of Heat On Immediate Recall Of Videotaped Lecture In College Students, Age 18 - 25 Proposed Study to Determine the Effects of Heat on Immediate Recall of Videotaped Lecture in College Students, Age 18 - 25 Dana Serrata The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College PSYC 3301.01 December 3, 1996 Dr. D. Freeberg Proposed Study to Determine the Effects of Heat on Immediate Recall of Videotaped Lecture in College Students, Age 18 - 25 Researchers have studied many aspects of temperature effects on human perception and cognition. Thermal stress, in the form of extreme heat, has been studied by examining the human response under this environmental condition (Hancock, 1986). In this way, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how the human body and mind react to adverse environmental conditions and adapt to those circumstances or surroundings (Bell, 1981). Many studies of this type have focused on thermal stress and human performance in the work environment (Enander Bonnet, 1990; Meese, et al. 1984). Bonnet (1990) suggests that an elevated ambient temperature increases the stress of work. Researchers seem to agree that the core temperature of the body is closely tied to the perception of uncomfortable heat (or cold) (Bell, 1981; Bonnet, 1990; Enander Meese, et al. 1984; Hancock, 1986). Bell (1981) states that the core temperature of the body is 98.6 F, and that an elevation of this temperature above 113 F leads to death. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) endorses a range of temperatures that may be considered ambient and provide thermal comfort for most people. This ambient range is from 76F to 80F with an average relative humidity of 45% (Rohles, 1973). Some researchers have manipulated the ambient temperature to induce heat stress while testing subjects on cognitive and mental tasks. Pepler and Warner (1968) had undergraduate students study a self-teaching programmed text during exposure to six different temperature levels ranging from 16.7 to 33.3C at 45% relative humidity. These students worked at a faster rate at high and low temperatures, with a higher rate of error. Wyon (1979), who has studied the effects of heat stress on mental performance in children, found that maximum performance on a word memory test was reached at 26C. Bell and Greene (1982) have discussed three theoretical approaches which have been applied to interpret the effects of thermal stress on performance of which attention is one; along with body temperature and arousal. In their theory regarding attention, Bell and Greene state that information overload occurs when the demand for attention exceeds the limited information processing capacity available. This situation would be more likely to occur when an environmental stressor is present. Therefore, according to their theory, task performance changes under thermal stress and promotes adaptability in the cognitive strategies used to complete the task (Cohen, et al. 1986). Unfortunately, little research has been conducted on the effects of thermal stress on cognitive and mental tasks. Most research has focused on vigilance and manual tasks which reflects the practical purpose of these studies, which have been geared toward the military and certain types of work environments (Enander & Hygge, 1990). However, the research which has been conducted suggests an adverse effect on cognitive functions by thermal stress. This study proposes that the thermal heat stress encountered in a classroom will negatively effect the immediate recall ability of undergraduate college students. A post-test on content recall of a videotaped lecture will be given to two groups, the experimental group will be assigned to the hot room and encounter the thermal stress, while the control group will be in an ambient temperature classroom. Low scores on the post-test for the thermally stressed group will indicate a possible effect of heat on recall ability. Method Participants Participants will be 60 volunteers, 30 male and 30 female, undergraduate students from introductory psychology courses at The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College. Participants will range in age from 18 to 25 years old, must be fluent in the English language (written and spoken), must have normal or corrected eyesight and hearing, and no chronic physical problems. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the ambient temperature or hot temperature classroom, with

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

3 Cases of Poorly Constructed Short Lists

3 Cases of Poorly Constructed Short Lists 3 Cases of Poorly Constructed Short Lists 3 Cases of Poorly Constructed Short Lists By Mark Nichol In each of the following sentences, the writer is under the misapprehension that the statement includes a list of three words and/or phrases; in fact, each sentence includes a compound list item and a simple list item (or at least is better rendered so that it does), for a total of two items. Discussion of each example explains the problem, and a revision after each sentence resolves the problem. 1. These projects provide the needed insight as to where these measures work, don’t work, and why. One solution for this sentence is to express the elements completely: â€Å"These projects provide the needed insight as to where these measures work, where they don’t work, and why they don’t work.† However, a simpler, more concise solution is to combine work and â€Å"don’t work† into one element: â€Å"These projects provide the needed insight as to where these measures work or don’t work and why.† 2. Many lament a system that is unfair, discriminatory, and one where the American Dream is out of reach. Sentences such as this, as with the first revision in the previous example, can often be repaired by supporting the middle element of the list with phrasing parallel to that of the first and last elements, but the final element is problematic, too, so the simplest approach is to pair unfair and discriminatory: â€Å"Many lament a system that is unfair and discriminatory, and one where the American Dream is out of reach.† (Those words may seem redundant, but in context they are distinct.) 3. The convergence of increased regulation, the need for modernization and innovation, combined with an exponential increase in cyber risk, creates a major challenge for insurance companies.   The complication in this sentence is that â€Å"combined with an exponential increase in cyber risk† is treated as a list item rather than a related but distinct parenthetical. In addition, the second item, with its â€Å"a and b† structure, is already complex. But the simple first item and the complex second item can easily be bridged with a conjunction rather than a comma to become syntactically valid: â€Å"The convergence of increased regulation and the need for modernization and innovation, combined with an exponential increase in cyber risk, creates a major challenge for insurance companies.† Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Style category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Is She a "Lady" or a "Woman"?Expanded and ExtendedThe 7 Types of Possessive Case

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Summary Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words - 7

Summary - Essay Example In 1992, 14 tourism courses in universities were introduced among others in different parts. This article is intended to review the term† vocationalism†, it also brings out the typology to highlight degree content, the influence of this industry on the curriculum in various learning institutions. Vocationalism in the context of tourism studies refers to competence-based qualifications, and to have appropriate balance between practice and theory. Any vocationalism consideration in terms of tourism studies requires mentioning the National Vocational Qualification. That is why, National Council for Vocational Qualifications was established at five levels. Level four entails complex technical, specialist and professional work activities including those associated with design planning and problem solving techniques. The article that should emphasize on flexibility and flatter management hierarchies that has led to the recommendation of generic core of knowledge and skills, it also gives individuals the concept of connective specialization (Pender & Sharpley, 2004). Students are given opportunity to make choices and combine different kinds of teaching and learning methods in order to meet their target. It also outlines the significance of specialists having oversight of the relationship between their specialization and the whole curriculum. Tourism has grown inconsiderately across industrial sectors and academic disciplines. Therefore it is very problematic to identify the contents of the course at higher levels. The teachers have also not given the relevant definition of what they teach, and as a result many related courses have so far evolved due to initiatives of individuals. This may be the cause of problems with the identification of laws for tourism industry as well as its needs that must be respected and given much consideration. According to Hunter-Jones’ view, the discipline taught must be able to reflect the obligations of managers to con sumers, employee and the public at large. The course must at all times replicate the opportunities of organization to develop and run successfully. Therefore, a curriculum planning is very vital for educators to be able to operate their institutions with limited problems (Pender & Sharpley, 2004). There is a permanent problem of tourism versus hospitality studies that needs to be addressed. It is the issue of content of these related courses. According to the research carried out in Australia, many distinct learning towards hospitality and in one case it is hard to find any broader tourism content. It is clear that all institutions related to tourism or travel has tended to provide training for specific jobs that are vocationally motivated. These policies of universities have over the recent times become distorted, changing more and more toward career orientation. There is need for review of the type of tourism degree; this must consider the use issue of work experience- therefore t raining in practical skills should be seen as important by the industry. This should be reflected in the course structure, to offer guide to the business orientation of individual courses. A case study done by Swarbrooke in 1995, views tourism courses as vocational in nature and only focused on the supply side†¦ leisure courses are split between the more vocational leisure